Strip Club with Dwarf-tossing

dwarf2Before the strip club’s doors even opened for the night, the reservation list was seven pages long. People had come for this — a chance to win a trophy engraved “Dwarf-Tossing Champion.”

When word first got out about the Strip Club`s plans to host a dwarf toss, journalists from across North America began calling club manager Barry Maroon. Some slammed the event as dangerous and degrading, others shrugged it off as Kalbefleisch’s legal livelihood.

That’s the view Maroon takes.

“He’s plying his trade,” he says. “Let him choose if it’s right or wrong. Why are we judging what’s good for this kid? He’s 30 years old!”

This controversy is not new to Windsor. Leopard’s first hosted dwarf-tossing in 2003. On that occasion Kalbefleisch, who goes by the stage name of “Tripod,” donned a Papa Smurf costume. The event inspired Sandra Pupatello, a local MPP, to introduce a bill at Queen’s Park banning dwarf-tossing. It fell flat.

Now Tripod is back, this time in a blue baby costume, complete with bonnet and bottle.

The way it works, pairs of competitors throw Kalbefleisch, who stands 4-foot-8, across the stage, where he lands on his back on air mattresses. Typically he flies about eight feet. 

The Leopard’s exotic dancers have their own concerns. Yes, the place is packed — busier than normal, right from 8 p.m. But these patrons are ignoring them. The women pester Maroon: how are they going to make any money tonight? He reassures them the patrons will stay for their dancing between competition rounds.

For Maroon, it’s a roaring success. The club is at capacity — about 250 people — and a long line snakes out to the street. In total, 1,000 people will pass through the doors.

Maroon chalks up controversy about the event to misunderstanding. People imagine little people getting hurled into walls, breaking bones. But Kalbefleisch is an entrepreneur, an athlete, who contacted the club about the event. When he’s thrown, he knows how to land it.

“We are so careful about everything,” says Maroon. “There is no danger factor. Your roadside hockey game would have more of a danger factor than this.”